Gettysburg Address as a small poster

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This is a smaller, commercially-printed version of the 1908 print of the Gettysburg Address by M. C. Brown & Co.

Also available, Gettysburg Address in full color with Lincoln and flags — Archival print


A reproduction of the 1908 print of the Gettysburg Address, with President Lincoln surrounded by flags at the top, and cannon, “High tide at Gettysburg,” and “The Bloody Angle” at the bottom. 

Size: 11" x 14"

About the paper weight and printing process: Printed on a 10 pt. Cardstock matte using standard inks. 

Also available, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Stovepipe Hat Shirt and Long-sleeved shirt.

You might also be interested in the Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation — Archival print.


Historical background

President Lincoln delivered his brief remarks during the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of November 19, 1863, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated Confederate forces at the Battle of Gettysburg. 

"Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
"Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war.
"We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground.
"The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.
"The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.
"It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." 

Edward Everett, considered the nation's greatest orator at that time, was the main speaker, not Lincoln. Everett spoke for two hours—you can read his speech here—and he was followed by a musical selection. Lincoln spoke next. His remarks lasted about two minutes.

 Source: Wikipedia

 

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